The Goats Agree

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papershopprojects:

The Japan Times, September 23, 2014
Ainu, Okinawans join first U.N. indigenous peoples’ conference

Pictured: Keiko Itokazu, an Upper House member from Okinawa Prefecture, delivers a speech during the United Nations-backed World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, which ran through Tuesday. | KYODO
Delegates for indigenous peoples from around the world, including Ainu and Okinawans, gathered this week at the United Nations to discuss measures to ensure their political representation and freedom from discrimination in the first U.N.-backed conference of its kind.
Kazushi Abe, vice president of the Ainu Association of Hokkaido, and Shisei Toma, of the Association of the Indigenous Peoples in the Ryukyus, an Okinawa civic association, were among those invited to speak at the two-day World Conference on Indigenous Peoples through Tuesday.
The two-day conference focused on the implementation by the U.N. and national and local governments of the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Rights, which was adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 2007.
The declaration promotes the rights of indigenous peoples to organize their own political systems, live free from discrimination, hold their traditional land, be consulted on development that affects them and other human rights. It is not a legally binding instrument under international law.
According to the U.N., there are at least 370 million people making up 5,000 indigenous groups in 70 countries throughout the world.
Opening the conference on Monday, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said its success “is integral to progress for all humanity.”
Abe, 67, said: “It’s outstanding that an indigenous peoples’ conference is staged for two days (when world leaders gather) during the U.N. General Assembly.”
The Ainu group leader had planned a speech to press the Japanese government to implement the U.N. declaration but was unable to due to time constraints.
Abe, who participated as a member of the government delegation, said he was “very impressed that the Japanese government was understanding and took part together.”
“We hope to work together with other indigenous peoples in the world and that our children and grandchildren will be proud of being Ainu in the future,” he added.
Also at the opening session at the General Assembly hall, participants adopted a resolution reaffirming U.N. member states’ commitment to the declaration and asking the secretary-general to create an action plan.
[source]

papershopprojects:

The Japan Times, September 23, 2014

Ainu, Okinawans join first U.N. indigenous peoples’ conference

Pictured: Keiko Itokazu, an Upper House member from Okinawa Prefecture, delivers a speech during the United Nations-backed World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, which ran through Tuesday. | KYODO

Delegates for indigenous peoples from around the world, including Ainu and Okinawans, gathered this week at the United Nations to discuss measures to ensure their political representation and freedom from discrimination in the first U.N.-backed conference of its kind.

Kazushi Abe, vice president of the Ainu Association of Hokkaido, and Shisei Toma, of the Association of the Indigenous Peoples in the Ryukyus, an Okinawa civic association, were among those invited to speak at the two-day World Conference on Indigenous Peoples through Tuesday.

The two-day conference focused on the implementation by the U.N. and national and local governments of the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Rights, which was adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 2007.

The declaration promotes the rights of indigenous peoples to organize their own political systems, live free from discrimination, hold their traditional land, be consulted on development that affects them and other human rights. It is not a legally binding instrument under international law.

According to the U.N., there are at least 370 million people making up 5,000 indigenous groups in 70 countries throughout the world.

Opening the conference on Monday, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said its success “is integral to progress for all humanity.”

Abe, 67, said: “It’s outstanding that an indigenous peoples’ conference is staged for two days (when world leaders gather) during the U.N. General Assembly.”

The Ainu group leader had planned a speech to press the Japanese government to implement the U.N. declaration but was unable to due to time constraints.

Abe, who participated as a member of the government delegation, said he was “very impressed that the Japanese government was understanding and took part together.”

“We hope to work together with other indigenous peoples in the world and that our children and grandchildren will be proud of being Ainu in the future,” he added.

Also at the opening session at the General Assembly hall, participants adopted a resolution reaffirming U.N. member states’ commitment to the declaration and asking the secretary-general to create an action plan.

[source]

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stunningpicture:

Sheep highway in Ireland.

stunningpicture:

Sheep highway in Ireland.

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ryanpanos:

The Bus | Paul Kirchner | Via

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noturbabygurl:

cubbyzissou:

Gonna reblog this every Tuesday.

me every fuckign day

(Source: hurwitzs)

monobeartheater:

wowwoohoo:

So I can’t do my math homework cause my duck fell asleep on my calculator..

send this picture to your teacher they will understand

monobeartheater:

wowwoohoo:

So I can’t do my math homework cause my duck fell asleep on my calculator..

send this picture to your teacher they will understand

(via i-cut-my-nightmares-out-of-paper)

We quickly located a firefighter costume for boys, complete with a bright red jacket, a traditional helmet and an axe. The girls’ version, on the other hand, is a skin-tight, short, shiny dress that’s surely flammable. It includes a fascinator (in lieu of a helmet) never before seen on a real firefighter.

The model on the package, who looks to be about the same age as my daughter, completes the outfit with heeled, calf-high boots — not ideal for running into burning buildings, or trick-or-treating for that matter. The costume is for children four to six and it’s one of several provocative costumes for the age group.

Even the pumpkin costume for preschoolers is sexy: it’s sleeveless and features a black bodice with an orange ribbon that laces up the front like a corset. I found the girls’ firefighter and the police officer costumes the most offensive, as they hung on the rack in stark contrast to the boys’ versions.

What kind of message do these costumes send to our girls? While the boys have costumes that look like the real thing, girls are expected to dress up in spoof ensembles, thus suggesting they can’t, or shouldn’t, do the real job. The costumes are not only “sexy,” they’re also sexist.

Halloween Costumes Are Sexualizing Our Youngest Trick-Or-Treaters

(via fucknosexistcostumes)

This isn’t just about halloween costumes. My incredibly petite 3 year old nephew is currently wearing a shirt for 7 year old girls. It fits him perfectly. On an actual 7 year old girl it’d be skin-tight. Even the most gender-neutral of girls clothing is sexualized and that’s not okay.

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

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parliamentrook:

crystals are now for sale!!!

reblog and like this post for chances to win a custom crystal necklace of your choice, shipped anywhere. I will pick a winner on Monday :)

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mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

postracialcomments:

This picture reminded me of the picture in 1965

“Hog-spitting – not just spitting,” Tonja Bulley emphatically clarifies.

“He just hog-spit at my baby. He hog-spit. He took everything out of him and spit in my daughter’s face. She is a minor. That’s the absolute worst thing you can do, when you spit on another human being. She was just saying ‘No justice, no peace’ and he hog-spit (at) and then smacked my baby. At that time — there was no more being peaceful.”

Bulley and her daughter, Brandy were released from jail last night after being arrested by police outside the St. Louis Rams game the previous day after a violent clash with football fans.

As the Rams were completing an impressive 28-26 victory over the Super Bowl champions Seattle Seahawks, Tonja and Brandy were outside the stadium participating in a non-violent protest calling for justice for Mike Brown, and the immediate arrest of his killer, Darren Wilson.

Tonja, known affectionately to her friends as “Tiny,” continued:

“We were peacefully protesting. We were saying something that this big, tall White man did not like. He should’ve been locked up, and they did not lock him up. One slapped my daughter and another hit her with his fist. Another woman threw her drink on me – and I retaliated. I’m not coming out to fight, but I have the right to protect myself.”

Tiny would eventually get punched and knocked to the ground. “I got hit by a couple people. I have a mark behind my ear.” She was initially charged with two felonies for throwing punches after the initial altercation. No violent Rams fans were arrested.

She says the racial double-standards were apparent: “We had a right to protest without anybody interfering. When the White people protest, there are no problems. Nobody is spitting on them. When we try to do it, the media goes around and acts like we started (the fighting.) We did not start it. I peacefully protest every day in Ferguson, and it’s never a problem.”

In Ferguson, Tiny and Brandy have been protesting since Brown was killed in August, and have become unofficial members of the Lost Voices—a spirited and well-known group of young leaders who led Sunday’s protest.

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(via vondell-txt)

skeleton onesie, fox cowl and my dads coat im in my truest comfy form and so hapy

skeleton onesie, fox cowl and my dads coat im in my truest comfy form and so hapy

cozy in bed in my onesie with jake and im very happy and warm and in love and its super nice